Black Lives Matter- Protest with Chalk

Ran across this article today. Chalk drawing protests that were power washed or street swept away, over and over. City officials called it ‘graffiti’ and it can now be grounds for a citation. It doesn’t really matter where it happened in the US, we know things like this happen all the time in every state.

Use this article to open up age-appropriate anti-racism conversations with your kids. Read the article (or parts of it) together. Ask what surprised them. Where did they see racism at work in what happened? What would be an anti-racist ally response to what happened?

Then get out the chalk. Give your kid(s) a place to protest by creating a Black Lives Matter chalk drawing on the driveway, sidewalk, or road. And keep talking. The action of drawing Black Lives Matter is great, but it’s the conversation and questions about racism and activism that help give our kids language to be anti-racist allies.

As you draw, consider listening to a podcast to learn more about racism in the US, or hear what protestors are doing to keep Black Lives Matter growing in the US, or listen to music that talks about change.

And after it rains, write it again. And again. And again.

Kids, Race, and Unity- Nick News Presents

Have you run into this? It’s Awesome.

A full episode about racism, current events, and anti-racism activism with elementary kids and youth, hosted by Alicia Keys. Meet the women who started Black Lives Matter, hear from kids that experience racism at their school and are activists in their communities, and listen to families of color talk about living in a white supremacy society and working for change.

Looking for more resources? Check out https://www.nickhelps.com/

At-Home Worship: A Family Talk About Racism

Our kids are the leaders of a more equitable future! As we seek change, justice, and equity- it’s important to give our kids language and tools to recognize racism and empower them to be an ally or educator.

This lesson was used in The Message during Lent this year. Read the book together, work through the discussion questions, and connect as a family to your role as God’s hands and feet in a broken world.

For younger kids, check out Naomi O’Brien’s lesson plan and approach to talking about race to younger children. She uses the story ‘Chocolate ME!’ to encourage problem solving and racism awareness.